From Brazil

with Vincent Bevins and guests

Profile About Vincent Bevins, the blog, and contributors Claire Rigby and Dom Phillips

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O pior aspecto do Brasil

Por Vincent Bevins
20/08/14 13:31

vivara

A brutal desigualdade brasileira é tão onipresente que os que vivem aqui simplesmente param de notá-la. Uma mensagem inesperada do exterior serve como lembrete de um tema tão pouco discutido tanto na sociedade quanto na mídia e na eleição atual.

[to read the original post in English, click here]*

Moro no Brasil há mais de quatro anos, o que tem sido incrível em quase todos os aspectos, incluindo as formas que arrumei para me adaptar à cultura local. Por outro lado, há partes do país e do meu processo de adaptação que não gosto. Odeio sobretudo a forma como me tornei insensível a níveis chocantes, brutais e ridículos de desigualdade, que minam o avanço do país. Me acostumei a eles, passei a vê-los como algo de certo modo aceitável.

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The worst thing about Brazil

Por Vincent Bevins
11/08/14 17:04

vivara

Brazil’s brutal inequality is so ubiquitous that those who live here simply stop noticing it. An unexpected message from abroad serves as a reminder of the topic that is so rarely discussed here, in society, the media, or the current election.

I’ve been living in Brazil for over four years now, which has been incredible in almost every way, including the ways in which I’ve adapted to the local culture. But there’s the bits I don’t like, too. More than anything else, I hate the way I’ve become desensitized to shocking, brutal, and stultifying levels of inequality. I’ve become accustomed to it, as if it were or ever should be normal.

[para ler o texto em Português, clique aqui]

This, most foreigners in Brazil learn quickly enough, is actually one of the required characteristics of being authentically “Brazilian.” True locals understand that extreme inequality is just a fact of life here, and it is bad taste to bring it up or transgress established class boundaries, so much so that an extreme preoccupation with the topic, or wanting to get to know Brazil outside elite circles, are sometimes considered “gringo” things to do. The more I find myself  becoming “local” in this sense (and in this sense only), the more uncomfortable I become.

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Before and after the World Cup

Por frombrazil
21/07/14 17:00

arqui

The very fun World Cup confounded expectations while exposing some deep truths. Was it all worth it?  Above, dismantling the extra seats at São Paulo’s Itaquerão Stadium.

James Young
Belo Horizonte

It is January. The foreign journalist sits at his desk in London (or New York or Berlin) and thinks about the World Cup. The foreign journalist is not happy. The foreign journalist is worried. The foreign journalist is angry. The stadiums are not ready, he hears, and even if they were, the traffic and the public transport network in Brazil is such a seething mess that he and his fellow foreign journalists would not be able to get from their expensive hotels to the matches anyway. People say the hundreds of thousands of protestors who took to the streets last June will back in five months’ time, and that there will be more of them, and that they will be more furious and more violent. “It’s the World Cup of chaos!” he writes, and leans back in his chair, pleased with his work.

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Cup weeks 3 and 4 – actually about football

Por Vincent Bevins
16/07/14 13:39

mulla

The Cup went well enough that we finally got to focus on the soccer for a few weeks. Now, it’s back to the real problems.

Vincent Bevins
Rio de Janeiro

Since early May, and really, since June 2013, we’ve seen the meaning of the World Cup shift radically, many times. Before it all started, the questions were “Is this going to happen?” and, “Will Brazil hate their own World Cup?” We thought it would probably be fine, but many thought otherwise.

Then it started, and the mood in the country was “Wow, this is going pretty well.” By week two, it was time for the World Cup optimists and government supporters to declare victory, as well as to say “I told you so.” But in the last two weeks of the tournament, another shift took place, to a theme which never should have been surprising.

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Manaus – stories from a distant city

Por frombrazil
09/07/14 11:19

World Cup matches in Manaus are long over, but did the spotlight help the city transcend its reputation as a jungle outpost? Above, photos from Leco Jucá, part of a collective aiming to shine some light on the real city.

by Chris Feliciano Arnold

On the Sunday of the U.S.-Portugal match in Manaus, Isaura Vitória Fróes Ramos sunbathed on the top deck of a riverboat near the Lago do Iranduba.  With a cold beer in hand and salted steaks on a nearby grill, she raved about the World Cup.

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Copa week 2 – I told you so

Por frombrazil
01/07/14 16:36

toldya3

The government must be relieved that things have gone relatively smoothly, though a Brazil loss still strikes terror into the hearts of many here. With protests and strife in the background for now, many Brazilians have been mixing with foreigners meaningfully for the first time.

James Young
Belo Horizonte

For the last few months the war cry of Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff was that the tournament would be “a Copa das Copas” – the best World Cup of them all. Even as stadium work stumbled, rather than raced, towards the finishing line, and worries remained over creaky transport networks and the chaos wrought in a number of cities by striking bus drivers and policemen, under-fire Dilma remained defiant – everything would be alright on the night.

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Soccer and US-Brazil relations

Por frombrazil
22/06/14 13:03

klinsmann

U.S.-Brazil relations are still strained due to allegations of high-level NSA spying and corporate espionage. In the unlikely event that the US team makes a strong showing at the World Cup this year, how would Brazilians respond? Any chances of success hinge on today’s game against Portugal.

Nathan Walters
Rio de Janeiro

I am always surprised when I ask Brazilians which team will win the World Cup, and the answer is not a quick and emphatic “Brazil, of course.” Most weigh the possible outcomes: the usual suspects Holland and Germany can’t be ruled out (just a few days ago Spain was also on the list); Belgium could do something amazing. I always find this strange because whenever anyone asks for my forecast I invariably say “The United States, of course.”

The response is usually greeted with laughter (sometime more than is really called for), and then a short explanation of why this is not possible.

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Copa week 1 – men, few problems, and boos

Por Vincent Bevins
19/06/14 19:16

uru

Vincent Bevins
Natal

We’ve had a week of the World Cup now, and here’s my first impressions. This is not a promise to do this every week.

Lots of dudes

I was in Berlin for the 2006 World Cup, and I spent a few years thinking about the arrival of the 2014 World Cup, so I really should have expected this. I admit to my stupidity. I admit I was surprised to see that the vast, vast majority of World Cup fans who have arrived are groups of men.

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São Paulo: A users’ guide

Por frombrazil
12/06/14 19:41

from-Minocao_claire-rigby

As the World Cup kicks off in São Paulo today, Claire Rigby presents Brazil’s big bad city and reveals its best-kept secret: a heart of gold

Claire Rigby
São Paulo

World Cup visitors, welcome to South America’s biggest, baddest metropolis. São Paulo’s reputation precedes it like a shadow, slinking ahead with tales of hardship, violence and crime, and more recently, of a wave of protests, strikes and mass occupations. The city’s mean-streets image are enough to give even Brazilian visitors a moment’s pause as they approach its sprawling perimeter for the first time.

Once inside the megacity, the often dystopian landscape doesn’t help. Despite its many lovely nooks and crannies, parts of São Paulo look like a city in the aftermath of an invasion – blackened, dusty and spattered with illegible graffiti, with what look like refugees roaming the streets, wrapped in blankets, bewildered. At the other extreme, featureless towers rise like luxury ghettoes from empty streets, with cars sliding in and out of their subterranean carparks silently, like drones.

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Brushing up on Brazil – background reading

Por Vincent Bevins
11/06/14 19:25

backup

You may have heard there is a large country called Brazil that will soon have a big soccer tournament. For those that would like to take that opportunity to brush up a bit on Latin America’s largest and most Brazilian country, I’ve compiled a list of links that make for good background reading. Most are from contributors to this blog, some are from other correspondents, and some from Brazilians.

There’s a lot here, so the idea is you could skim it and pick out some items as you wish. Organized by topic.

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